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Arthritis

What should you know about arthritis?

Arthritis is a painful condition involving the inflammation of joints. It is a very common condition and has many causes. It primarily affects older people but it can also develop in younger adults and even in children.

An estimated 10 million people in Britain have some form of arthritis.


Types of arthritis

The two most common types of arthritis are:


Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis in the UK, affecting around 8 million people.

It most often develops in adults who are in their late 40s or older. It's also more common in women and people with a family history of the condition. However, it can occur at any age as a result of an injury or be associated with other joint-related conditions, such as gout or rheumatoid arthritis.

Osteoarthritis initially affects the smooth cartilage lining of the joint. This makes movement more difficult than usual, leading to pain and stiffness.

Once the cartilage lining starts to roughen and thin out, the tendons and ligaments have to work harder. This can cause swelling and the formation of bony spurs, called osteophytes.

Severe loss of cartilage can lead to bone rubbing on bone, altering the shape of the joint and forcing the bones out of their normal position.

The most commonly affected joints are those in the:

  • hands
  • spine
  • knees
  • hips

Rheumatoid arthritis

In the UK, rheumatoid arthritis affects more than 400,000 people. It often starts when a person is between 40 and 50 years old. Women are three times more likely to be affected than men.

Rheumatoid and osteoarthritis are two different conditions. Rheumatoid arthritis occurs when the body's immune system targets affected joints, which leads to pain and swelling. 

The outer covering (synovium) of the joint is the first place affected. This can then spread across the joint, leading to further swelling and a change in the joint's shape. This may cause the bone and cartilage to break down.

People with rheumatoid arthritis can also develop problems with other tissues and organs in their body. 

What can you do to prevent it and improve your self-care?

There is no cure for arthritis and the emphasis therefore lies on trying to prevent it from occurring in the first place.

The main ways of doing this are by:

  • maintaining a healthy weight (to reduce pressure on your joints)
  • avoiding smoking
  • taking precautions to avoid injury (i.e. wearing the right protective equipment while playing sports)

What if you already have arthritis?

There are many treatments that can help slow down the condition.

For osteoarthritis, medications are often prescribed, including:

In severe cases, the following surgical procedures may be recommended:

  • arthroplasty (joint replacement)
  • arthodesis (joint fusion)
  • osteotomy (where a bone is cut and re-aligned)

Read more about how osteoarthritis is treated.

Treatment for rheumatoid arthritis aims to slow down the condition's progress and minimise joint inflammation or swelling. This is to try and prevent damage to the joints. Recommended treatments include:

  • analgesics (painkillers)
  • disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) – a combination of treatments is often recommended
  • physiotherapy 
  • regular exercise 

For more information on living with arthritis, click here.

Contact details for local sources of help.

Leading a healthy, active lifestyle will help to reduce your risk of developing arthritis and will slow its progression. See here for ways to improve your all-round health and wellbeing.


Arthritis Care

Helping people across the UK to live with arthritis.

website: https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/

Tel: 0808 800 4050


Rushmoor Healthy Living

Delivering a variety of projects across the local community, working together with individuals, groups and companies with the aim of improving people’s health and wellbeing, whether through exercise and rehabilitation classes or through health education.

website: www.rhl.org.uk

email: admin@rhl.org.uk

Tel: 01252 362 660

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